Olivia Rodrigo returns to the top of the Billboard 200 album chart for a fifth week with her debut album 'Sour', following its vinyl LP release on Aug. 20 (the album originally came out in May). In the week ending Aug. 26, 'Sour' earned 133,000 equivalent album units in the U.S. (up 133%). Of that sum, album sales comprise 84,000 (up 1,201%), with vinyl LP sales equaling 76,000 of that figure - the second-largest sales week for a vinyl album since MRC Data began electronically tracking sales in 1991. The only larger week was by Taylor Swift’s 'Evermore', when it sold 102,000 on vinyl in the week ending June 3, Billboard reports.

Olivia Rodrigo has added Paramore's singer Hayley Williams and ex-guitarist Josh Farro as co-writers of her hit single 'Good 4 U'. They were not credited when the song was originally released in May. Warner Chappell Music announced this week via Instagram that Williams and Farro were now credited 'Good 4 U' songwriters. "The fact WCM confirmed this fact during 'Good 4 U' fourteenth week in the Top 5 of the Billboard Hot 100 perhaps says something about the journey that was required to make it happen" - Music Business Worldwide writes. C

Olivia Rodrigo’s 'Sour' earned 83,000 equivalent album units in the U.S. in the week ending July 16, notching the fourth total week at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart. 'Sour' is the first debut album by a woman to spend four weeks at No. 1 since Susan Boyle’s 'I Dreamed a Dream' spent six weeks in 2009/2010, Billboard reports. Speaking of records, Inhaler’s 'It Won’t Always Be Like This' opens at the top of the Official U.K. Albums Chart, with 18,000 chart sales, and the fastest-selling debut album on vinyl of any band this century.

New figures out of the US this week suggest that biggest hits are increasingly becoming smaller, Music Business Worldwide suggests, based on the latest streaming figures. The industry’s biggest streaming hit at the mid-year point of 2021 is significantly smaller than its biggest streaming hit at the mid-year point of 2020, of 2019, and of 2018. The biggest hit of H1 2021 in the US was Olivia Rodrigo’s 'drivers license', which attracted 460 million on-demand audio streams during the six months. In 2020 the biggest hit was Roddy Ricch’s 'The Box' with 728 million streams in the first half of the year, the prior year it was Lil Nas X’s 'Old Town Road' with 596 million streams, whereas in 2018 Drake’s 'God’s Plan' pulled in 655 million audio streams. This is all especially odd, of course, when you consider the massive growth in streaming’s popularity between 2017 and 2021. MBW offers a few explanations - it's a Covid-inspired anomaly, or maybe people are listening more to catalog music (older than year and a half).

Well, good for her
June 03, 2021

Olivia Rodrigo tops three charts in one week

Olivia Rodrigo scores her first Number One on the Rolling Stone Artists 500 Chart this week to the tune of a staggering 283.7 million streams. As her debut album 'Sour' rules the Billboard 200 albums chart and 'Good 4 U' leads the Rolling Stone 100, Rodrigo becomes only the third female artist to sweep all three charts in one week, Rolling Stone reports.

Olivia Rodrigo holds to the top of the UK Official Singles chart with 117,000 chart sales of her hit single 'Drivers Licence', some three times higher than her closest rival, Anne-Marie, KSI and Digital Farm Animals' 'Don’t Play'. The hit single clocks up 13.7 million streams, the biggest one-week figure for a Number 1 single in two years. the Official Charts reports. Also making waves is Longest Johns’ sea shanty 'Wellerman' which rides into the chart at No. 37 following enormous viral success on TikTok.

Disney Channel actor Olivia Rodrigo released her single 'Drivers License' to attract 82 million domestic streams across all platforms, the biggest US streaming week ever, and it had 15.17 million global Spotify streams on Jan. 11, a record for a non-holiday track. Stereogum argues the 17-year old's moody indie-pop ballad will have a big effect on pop music this year, and sees the song as a clear sign of a turn in pop-music: "Depressive guitar balladry might be a more reliable pathway to mainstream success than sparkling synth-pop. For years cultural critics have been noting that streaming, social media, and a lifestyle dominated by screen time were fostering a moodier, blearier mainstream".